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What you'll learn

Is it ever OK to cite Wikipedia? What makes a source trustworthy? How can you identify quality information? This broad introduction to media literacy gives students a set of tools they can use to evaluate sources online, on TV and in print, with an emphasis on developing research skills. Through hands-on activities and discussion, students learn how to build their media savvy and put their new tools and abilities to the test.

Grade(s)
  • 6-12
Duration
50 minutes
Day(s) offered
Monday–Friday
Time(s) offered
9 a.m.–4 p.m. ET
Cost

Free, with admission

Venue and Capacity
  • Learning Center (max 36)
  • Virtual (no limit)
Minimum enrollment
12 participants
Enrollment type
Registration required

Classes must be requested at least one week in advance. Please be advised that your preferred date may not be available, so have at least two dates in mind. We recommend arriving at the Newseum at least 15 minutes before your scheduled class time.

Groups larger than class capacity will be assigned staggered class times based on your group’s window of availably. We appreciate hands-on assistance from chaperones when needed.

Virtual classes: Virtual classes must be requested at least two weeks in advance. To request a free virtual class, please complete the virtual request form. All reservations are tentative pending confirmation of hardware and software capabilities.

You can register by completing our online form, calling 202/292-6650 or emailing educationprograms@newseum.org.

When a school fails to appear for its scheduled Newseum class, it prevents other schools from using that slot. Please notify us at least one week in advance if you must cancel your reservation.

Assistance (e.g. ASL interpretation, assistive listening, description) for programs/tours can be arranged with at least seven business days’ notice. Please contact AccessUs at AccessUs@newseum.org or by calling 202/292-6453.

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  • Media Ethics for Students

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Browse 1,000s of Lesson Plans, Digital Artifacts, Videos, Historical Events, Interactives and Other EDTools.

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