Skip Navigation

What you'll learn

From Facebook harassment to football protests, social media and clickbait content collide for heated, emotion-driven debates about free speech laws and limits. How can you cool the temperature and set a facts-first agenda? In this three hour workshop, NewseumED provides teaching tips, historical context and classroom-ready lessons on free speech basics, contemporary issues and checking for bias. Participants leave with new ways to help students find and assess sources  — and themselves for fairness to hold informed debates about their First Amendment rights.

This workshop includes interactive lessons with a Newseum educator, teaching strategies, and resources to share with colleagues.

Grade(s)
  • Educator
Duration
Other
Day(s) offered
Monday–Friday
Time(s) offered
8 a.m.–5 p.m. ET
Cost

Free

Venue and Capacity
  • Your location
Minimum enrollment
40 participants
Enrollment type
Registration required

Let us come to you!

We'll travel anywhere in the United States at our expense — between now and the end of June 2019. Fill out the application today; a limited numbers of workshops are available.

For more details on timing or content, please call the education reservation line at 202/292-6650 or write to educationprograms@newseum.org. 

Related EDClasses & Training

  • Making a Change for Students

    Students watch and discuss a Newseum-produced documentary about the role of the First Amendment freedoms in the civil rights movement and in protests today.

  • On the Campaign Trail: The Battle for Votes

    Students learn the persuasion techniques used by politicians when running for office, deepening their ability to analyze a variety of media produced by campaigns and to help separate fact from fiction.

  • The EXPRESSway

    Celebrate freedom of expression in this fun museum experience.

Browse 1,000s of Lesson Plans, Digital Artifacts, Videos, Historical Events, Interactives and Other EDTools.

Quick View
Keep in the loop.

Sign up for NewseumED updates and newsletter today.