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Find the Newseum at NCSS 2016

Join NewseumED in Washington, D.C. for the National Council of Social Studies annual conference. Attend a special event at the Newseum or find us in the exhibit hall and at sessions. All sessions and special events are FREE for NCSS conference attendees.

Nov. 14, 2016

Join NewseumED in Washington, D.C. for the National Council of Social Studies annual conference. Attend a special event at the Newseum or find us in the exhibit hall and at sessions. All sessions and special events are FREE for NCSS conference attendees.

Saturday, Dec. 3

8:30 a.m.–5 p.m. Exhibit Hall Open — Newseum Booth 520
(Get a free Newseum admission ticket when you visit booth #520 and register for NewseumED.)

8 a.m.– 9 a.m. The “Third Rail”: Teaching Controversial Content
(Convention Center, Room 142)

Ignite positive discourse on First Amendment flash points, from hate speech to religious discrimination, by using case studies as a safe entry point. Includes classroom-ready materials.

In this session, we’ll discuss ways – based on NewseumED’s experiences and widely held best practices – to provide a foundation to steer productive and comfortable conversations in the classroom about controversial subjects. In addition, we’ll share strategies on increasing student engagement and fostering a culture of inquiry.

We’ll model blended learning activities and a case-study approach to get students to safely, respectfully and productively debate controversial issues related to the First Amendment. This approach has several benefits. It:

  • creates a safe entry point for debate.
  • helps provide historical context for current issues students face today as global citizens.
  • offers guided questions for inquiry-based learning.
  • supports clear communication and persuasion skills. (Common Core, Speaking and Listening)
  • provides “contexts of given historical eras and the perspectives of different individuals and groups” of different times. (C3, Dimension 2)

1:30-2:30 p.m. Advocacy Amplified Through the First Amendment
(Convention Center, Room 144B)

How can students affect real change in their communities and beyond? Examine historical social campaigns to learn how First Amendment freedoms and persuasive tools can be leveraged to achieve goals.

At the core of this session is the belief that everyone – starting with students of any age – can develop their voices as global citizens by actively engaging in their communities and beyond. Using the Newseum’s unique strengths, this session approaches civic engagement from a fresh perspective that brings together an understanding of citizens’ rights, as framed by the First Amendment, with the skills and 21st century tools citizens need to communicate their efforts and enlarge the sphere of community participation.

This session builds on the C3 Framework’s emphasis on inquiry and historical literacies, including:

  • Evaluating primary sources and using evidence. (D3)
  • Communicating conclusions and taking informative action. (D4)
  • Providing “contexts of given historical eras and the perspectives of different individuals and groups” of different times. (D2)
  • Applying “a range of deliberative and democratic strategies and procedures to make decisions and take action in their classrooms and schools, and out-of-school civic context.” (D4)
  • Applying “civic virtues and democratic principles when working with others.” (D2)

We’ll start by looking backward to past social movements to understand how activists leveraged the power of First Amendment freedoms to bring about change. Pulling examples from our “Making a Change: The First Amendment and the Civil Rights Movement” and “Women, Their Rights and Nothing Less: The First Amendment and the Women’s Suffrage Movement” EDCollections, participants dissect the persuasive techniques used to shape public opinion and see how they can then apply knowledge about those campaigns to act on important social and political debates.

We’ll model our “Persuasion Portfolios” lesson, which sharpens media literacy skills by showing techniques for document analysis for perspective, authorship, audience, purpose and persuasion methods. In small groups, participants will put their knowledge of visual, verbal and technological advocacy strategies into practice through analysis and digital manipulation of primary sources.

Previous Events:

Thursday, Dec. 1

1:25-2:25 p.m. Constructive Conversations: 14 Resources for Your Post-Election Classroom
(Marriott Marquis Washington, D.C., Level 4 – NSSSA attendees only)
Help your students make sense of the dirt and divisiveness of the 2016 election and presidential transition. Get an overview of 14 teacher resources from NewseumED that use the entry points of history, media ethics and civics for holding thoughtful discussion and debate about our democracy and the role of the First Amendment in our political system.

2-6 p.m. From Clickbait to Content: Tips for Teaching Current Events
(at the Newseum – Advance registration required on-site at the convention center.)

Register at the NCSS registration desk

Already registered for the conference? Email conference@ncss.org to add this event to your registration.

More than any other generation, today’s youth are bombarded with information 24/7 on multiple and varied platforms. It is crucial that educators help students become savvy media consumers by learning to analyze news and all other kinds of sources for credibility, reliability and value.

This half-day session at the Newseum, in partnership with the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA), will explore ways teachers can increase news and media literacy that will enable students to make informed and well-reasoned decisions in a complex global environment. You’ll meet with media experts, peers and international industry insiders to gain strategies and ready-to-use resources for teaching media literacy to foster global citizenship.

Tentative Agenda:

2 p.m. Panel discussion and Q&A (Documentary Theater, Hubbard Concourse): Speakers from NewseumED (USA), The New York Times The Learning Network (USA), News-O-Matic (USA), #juniormedia (Poland) and News Decoder (France) will discuss how they are promoting global learning and share leading practices with a focus on using new technology. Participants will get tips for the classroom on ways to create a literate, civic-minded new generation.

3 p.m. Global Media Ethics (Documentary Theater, Hubbard Concourse): Journalists used to base decisions on what was best for their community, but technology today has blurred the definition of community. A decision made locally can have global repercussions, as evidenced by the publishing of Prophet Muhammad cartoons that enraged Muslims around the world. This workshop will provide participants with a look at the decision-making steps in news gathering and news production. What is news, and how do journalists decide what to cover? What factors affect how a story is played? We’ll explore the journalism principles of being fair, accurate and clear. Then, through large discussion and a small-group activity, participants will explore the tough ethical decisions journalists face daily.

4 p.m. Gallery Tour (Level 3): Participants will get a guided tour of the Newseum’s Time Warner World News Gallery, which provides a sweeping overview of the global news environment. A huge map — updated annually — illustrates the different levels of press freedoms in countries around the world. Participants will be asked to consider how a free press in a democracy can have positive and negative effects on people in countries without free expression.

4:30 p.m. Curatorial Session (Learning Center, Hubbard Concourse): An archivist will provide a behind-the-scenes look at the Newseum collection process and share recent international acquisitions.

5 p.m. Laureate Presentations (Documentary Theater, Hubbard Concourse): In this fast-paced session, participants will learn about the 16 winning strategies of the 2016 WAN-IFRA World Young Reader Prize awards that can be of immediate use in classrooms.

All participants will receive:

  • free admission to the Newseum.
  • a packet of classroom-ready activities and worksheets related to workshop content. All materials are adaptable across a range of subjects and grades.
  • a set of poster-sized national and international papers from the Newseum’s Today’s Front Pages exhibit.
  • a guide to using NewseumED’s online resources, including primary sources, videos and curricula tailored to classroom use.

Friday, Dec. 2

8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m. Exhibit Hall Open — Newseum Booth 520
(Get a free Newseum admission ticket when you visit booth #520 and register for NewseumED.)

6:30-9:30 p.m. President’s Reception
(Newseum – Advance registration required on-site at the convention center.)

Register at the NCSS registration desk

Already registered for the conference? Email conference@ncss.org to add this event to your registration.

This fun-filled evening comes with plenty of networking opportunities, activities, gallery tours, Wolfgang Puck catering, and two drink tickets per reservation. Explore the museum’s more than 30 exhibits and theaters devoted to the First Amendment.

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Dive into specially curated collections of primary sources and lessons on civil rights, women's suffrage and more.

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