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Duration
More than 90 minutes
Topic(s)
  • Civil Rights
  • Current Events
  • Journalism
  • Politics
Grade(s)
  • 6-12

(Note: For more support, see expanded procedure in downloadable lesson plan.)

  1. Ask students to define civil rights, based on previous class discussions.
  2. After a common definition is established, brainstorm contemporary local, regional and national civil rights issues.
  3. Have the class choose an issue to analyze. Find a recent article and analyze it as a class with the Analyzing an Issue worksheet.
  4. Next pair the students and have them select a modern civil rights issue and use the second worksheet to create an information campaign.
  5. Last, have students share their information campaign and ask for feedback. After they revise their plans they should implement them and report the outcomes of their work to the class.
  6. Reflect on what the students learned, and what, if anything, they would do differently to reach their goals.

  • Analyzing an Issue and Information Campaign worksheets (download), one each per student
  • Internet access

  1. Civil Rights Expo: Get the community involved! Have students plan and host a “civil rights expo” to share their projects with others at school, in their neighborhoods and beyond. Make sure students ask for reactions and feedback from their guests, which they can use to revise their projects. Students may want to invite their school paper, local media outlets and historical societies to the expo as well.
  1. At the Newseum: Visit the exhibit called “Make Some Noise: Students and the Civil Rights Movement.” Ask your students to evaluate the ways in which young people got involved in the movement. Which methods or approaches worked? Which did not? Why? Students should then review and revise their “Information Campaigns” to reflect lessons learned from their predecessors’ campaign results. 

 

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