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Duration
30-60 minutes
Topic(s)
  • Current Events
  • Journalism
Grade(s)
  • 6-12

  1. Go over the consumer’s questions as a class.
  2. Discuss why the questions are useful. Specifically, why do the answers to these questions matter?
  3. Choose a topic for the class to investigate. Brainstorm a list of ideas and vote. (You may want to prepare possible research topics.in advance.)
  4. Pass out the worksheets and have students research the chosen topic.
  5. Discuss the students' findings as a class.

  • Which of the consumer’s questions is the most important to apply/answer? Why?
  • Which of the consumer’s questions is the most difficult to apply/answer? Why?
  • Does a pattern emerge of the types of information sources that generally seem trustworthy and those that generally do not?
  • What types of visual or written clues help you determine if a source of information is trustworthy or not?

  • Putting the Consumer’s Questions to Work worksheet (download), one per student
  • Consumer’s Questions handout (download)
  • Internet access (if completing the worksheet in class)

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