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Artifact Date
June 27, 2015
Topic(s)
  • Civil Rights
  • Constitution
  • Supreme Court
Thumbnail

In a landmark ruling on June 26, 2015, the Supreme Court overturned bans on same-sex marriage in 14 states, making marriage for gay and lesbian couples legal anywhere in the United States. “No longer may this liberty be denied,” Justice Anthony M. Kennedy wrote for the majority in the 5-4 decision.

Most newspapers featured local reaction to the ruling, and reflected the divisiveness of the issue. With few exceptions, the photos were celebratory and often showed the rainbow colors of the Gay Pride flag. News coverage was almost entirely domestic; this story garnered little international attention.

Another story getting extensive coverage that day was President Barack Obama's lecture on America's racial history. Obama addressed the subject in a eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney, one of nine people killed in a racially motivated mass shooting in Charleston, S.C.

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Front Pages June 27, 2015

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