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Artifact Date
January 22, 2017
Topic(s)
  • Civil Rights
  • Elections
  • Journalism
  • Women's Rights
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The Women’s March on Washington took place on Jan. 21, 2017, President Donald Trump’s first full day in office. The purpose of the march was to advocate for women’s rights and protest the treatment of marginalized groups, such as immigrants and refugees. The overall message was one of unity, taking inspiration from the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s nonviolent protests.

Participants exercised their First Amendment rights to free speech, assembly and petition. They carried signs bearing slogans such as “Girls Just Wanna Have Fun-damental Rights” and “Immigrants: we get the job done,” a reference to the popular musical Hamilton.

The march in the nation's capital featured a series of high profile speakers and activists, including feminist Gloria Steinem, actress Scarlett Johansson, and Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards.

Hundreds of sister marches also took place on all seven continents. From Stockholm to Buenos Aires to New Delhi to Cape Town, marchers publicized their opposition to the Trump administration and pushed for women’s rights.

When covering the Women’s March, many newspapers chose to take a local angle, focusing on local marches or stories of community members that traveled to the Washington march, as well as covering rallies elsewhere.

View archived front pages from other events

Front Pages Jan. 22, 2017

Explore a series of national and international newspapers covering the marches. (Click on a front page, then press the pink “view larger” under an image to zoom in on a higher quality PDF file.)

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