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Examining the Power of the Press

What can I learn from journalism to become a better media consumer and communicator?

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You're exploring media literacy resources

Explore the Tools and Methods of Journalism

What can I learn from journalism to become a better media consumer and communicator?

  • EDCollection

    Fact Finder: Your Foolproof Guide to Media Literacy

    Bring the road-tested tools of journalism from the newsroom to your own newsfeed. Create a complete course of material on today’s media literacy essentials or sharpen a specific skill, from finding quality news to reporting it.

  • Video

    Ask an Expert: Anonymous Sources

    George Washington University professor Michael Freedman explains why anonymous sources are necessary sometimes and the guidelines that govern when and how journalists use them.

  • Classes & Training

    Photo Ethics

    Students become more critical consumers of visual information by examining real-life case studies of photojournalists striving to be accurate, fair and clear.

  • Lesson Plan

    'Running Toward Danger' Video Lesson

    Six journalists give first-person accounts of their courageous coverage on the terrorist attacks in 2001 on the twin towers in New York’s World Trade Center.

  • EDCollection

    Media Literacy Booster Pack

    Staying fresh and fluent in today’s media landscape isn’t easy. This collection of resources offers tools to tackle eight pressing challenges, from recognizing bias and propaganda to leveraging your role as a media contributor.

  • Lesson Plan

    Getting to the Source

    A layered graphic helps students understand how a news story goes from raw information – the source – to their newsfeed or text chain; then students zero in on sources in real-life news stories.

  • Classes & Training

    Choose the News

    Students learn how a newspaper front page reflects the interests and values of the community, then work in teams to create their own front pages.

  • Classes & Training

    Covering a Catastrophe

    Through the lens of the events of Sept. 11, 2001, students explore the unique practical and ethical challenges journalists face when covering breaking news.

  • Lesson Plan

    Is It Fair?

    A video and graphic help students tune up their “fairness meters” to detect three key factors that can determine how objective or biased a news story is; then they analyze real-life examples.

  • Classes & Training

    Free Press in America

    Through a case-study format, participants learn about the five freedoms of the First Amendment, limits to the freedom of the press and discuss modern day challenges driven by new technologies.

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Related EDClasses & Training

  • Media Ethics for Students

    Is it OK to clean up a quote or broadcast unconfirmed information? Students become more critical consumers of news media by examining real-life case studies of journalists striving to be accurate, fair and clear.
  • Photo Ethics

    Students become more critical consumers of visual information by examining real-life case studies of photojournalists striving to be accurate, fair and clear.
  • Covering a Catastrophe

    Through the lens of the events of Sept. 11, 2001, students explore the unique practical and ethical challenges journalists face when covering breaking news.
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