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Finding Reliable Facts

How can I find the information I need and evaluate its worth?

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You're exploring media literacy resources

Find Tools and Techniques to Evaluate Information

  • EDCollection

    Fact Finder: Your Foolproof Guide to Media Literacy

    Bring the road-tested tools of journalism from the newsroom to your own news feed. Create a complete course of material on today’s media literacy essentials or sharpen a specific skill, from finding quality news to reporting it.

  • Lesson Plan

    Weed Out Propaganda

    A bold digital poster outlines a simple acronym — S.E.E.D. — to help students learn to spot propaganda by recognizing four of its key techniques.

  • Classes & Training

    Fighting Fake News — Educator Workshop

    Arm your students with the skills they need to strike a balance between cynic and sucker as they navigate a media landscape where real and fake sometimes look all too similar.

  • Lesson Plan

    E.S.C.A.P.E. Junk News

    Students learn a handy acronym to help them remember six key concepts for evaluating information, then test the concepts in teams.

  • Video

    Ask an Expert: Anonymous Sources

    George Washington University professor Michael Freedman explains why anonymous sources are necessary sometimes and the guidelines that govern when and how journalists use them.

  • Lesson Plan

    Is It Fair?

    A video and graphic help students tune up their “fairness meters” to detect three key factors that can determine how objective or biased a news story is; then they analyze real-life examples.

  • Lesson Plan

    Am I Being Fair?

    A video and graphic introduce four proven strategies students can use to counter their own bias when surfing online or conducting research; then students practice using these strategies when investigating a real-life issue.

  • Classes & Training

    Media Ethics for Students

    Is it OK to clean up a quote or broadcast unconfirmed information? Students become more critical consumers of news media by examining real-life case studies of journalists striving to be accurate, fair and clear.

  • Lesson Plan

    Explore the Information Universe

    A map of the “information universe” helps students learn to define and identify different types of content, from fact-based reports to advertising or satire.

  • Classes & Training

    Choose the News

    Students learn how a newspaper front page reflects the interests and values of the community, then work in teams to create their own front pages.

  • EDCollection

    Media Literacy Booster Pack

    Staying fresh and fluent in today’s media landscape isn’t easy. This collection of resources offers tools to tackle eight pressing challenges, from recognizing bias and propaganda to leveraging your role as a media contributor.

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Related EDClasses & Training

  • Media Ethics for Students

    Is it OK to clean up a quote or broadcast unconfirmed information? Students become more critical consumers of news media by examining real-life case studies of journalists striving to be accurate, fair and clear.

  • Photo Ethics

    Students become more critical consumers of visual information by examining real-life case studies of photojournalists striving to be accurate, fair and clear.

  • Is It Fair? Evaluate Your Media

    Are accusations of bias clogging your news feed? Are your students quick to point out that something's unfair — but not as ready to explain why? Tune up your “fairness meter” to assess how objective or biased content really is.

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