Skip Navigation

Oh no, you’re missing out on great content!

This content contains copyrighted material that requires a free NewseumED account.

Registration is simple — and comes with full access to videos, artifact, interactives, shareable content, and more.

Sign Up
?

NewseumED is provided as a free educational resource and contains copyrighted material. Registration is required for full access. Signing up is simple and free.

or log in to your account

Once you create a free account, 
you’ll have access to:

  • Downloads
  • Videos and Artifacts
  • Interactives
  • and more!
Duration
Less than 30 minutes
Topic(s)
  • Current Events
  • Journalism
Grade(s)
  • 6-12
  • College/University

IMPORTANT NOTE: Fake news sites often feature content that is inappropriate for a classroom environment. We have attempted to locate examples that will work for different ages based on the content in the story and on the surrounding page. However, ad content and other featured headlines may change over time. DO NOT ASSUME THAT THESE EXAMPLES ARE CLASSROOM-READY. Please carefully review your selected examples in advance to ensure they are appropriate for your students. Or, for increased content control, use screengrabs to crop and adapt the content to meet your student’s needs.

  1. Select several real, fake and flawed websites from NewseumED's Teacher Resource. Add the links in an online voting tool such as Poll Everywhere or Google Forms.
    • If you need or opt to use the stories' archived URLs, be sure to use them for all examples so they don’t give away what’s real and what’s not.
  2. Tell students they are going to do a quick-fire activity to see how well they can identify online news reports as real, fake or flawed.
  3. Give students five minutes to click on each site and vote. This activity is meant to simulate the way people consume information today - very quickly - so remind students that the clock is ticking!
  4. Review the results as a class.

  • Examples for Evaluating Online News: Teacher Resource (download)
  • Computer access, one per student or small group, for website evaluation

  • Did you think this activity would be easy or hard? Why?
  • Which websites were easiest to identify as real or fake? Hardest? Why?
  • Would this activity be harder on a smartphone?
  • How likely is it that you've shared fake or flawed news? 

Hone students' information evaluation abilities with activities such as E.S.C.A.P.E. Junk News and Is This Story Share-Worthy? 

Explore More Lesson Plans

Quick View

Related EDClasses & Training

  • Photo Ethics

    Students become more critical consumers of visual information by examining real-life case studies of photojournalists striving to be accurate, fair and clear.
  • The EXPRESSway

    Celebrate freedom of expression in this fun museum experience.
  • The Civil War: From the Front Lines to the Front Pages

    Students see how technology affected news coverage and public perception of the Civil War, then create their own front pages with breaking news, maps and telegrams.
Keep in the loop.

Sign up for NewseumED updates and newsletter today.