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Duration
More than 90 minutes
Topic(s)
  • Current Events
  • Journalism
Grade(s)
  • 6-12

  1. Ask your students if they agree with everything they see on TV, read about in newspapers/magazines or hear on the radio. Do you ever have unanswered questions? Discuss responses.
  2. Tell them they will create a response to a news story, editorial or opinion piece that they disagree with or leaves them with unanswered questions. They will create a project to counter or expand on the other report.
  3. First they need to find a story and complete the worksheet. Share the publications you have gathered and/or or give them internet access. Give students time to select and read an article of interest.
    • Remind students the activity is about talking back. They should find an article they want to respond to.
  4. Ask students to share their findings and discuss.
  5. Allow students time in class or at home to create their project.
    • You may discuss project ideas as a group. (Examples: blog entry, video blog, column/article, cartoon, etc.)
  6. Share and discuss completed projects as a group.

  • Time to Talk Back worksheet (download), one per student
  • Tools to create their own project (computers, video recorders, cameras, posters)
  • A selection of news publications for students to review for articles
  • Internet access (optional)

  • How can you communicate with the news publication directly?
  • What did this assignment teach you about reading the news?
  • What types of questions should you ask yourself as you consume news each day?

 

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